SOUTH CAROLINA | 2010 | U.S. Senate Primary

Unknown Deadbeat defeats a Respected public servant on unverifiable touchscreen voting machines

Suspicious results and paper ballot counts indicate a fraudulent 2010 Democratic primary for U.S. Senate in South Carolina.

OVERVIEW

  • Shocking Upset: A respected career public servant lost by an 18-point margin to an unknown deadbeat.
  • No Accountability: Touchscreen voting machines were riggable, unverifiable, and impossible to audit.
  • Statistical Evidence: Paper absentee ballots showed opposite results compared to electronic voting.
  • Strategic Rigging: Manipulating a low-attention primary to field a weak opponent in the general election is a subtle form of election rigging.
  • Who Benefits: Tea Party extremist Jim DeMint sailed to victory in the general election, allowing his radical views to influence the U.S. Senate.

The most important fact about South Carolina’s voting system is that most ballots cannot be effectively audited or recounted.
— Verified Voting

SHOCKING UPSET

An unknown deadbeat, Alvin Greene, defeated a successful public servant, Vic Rawl, by an enormous margin of 18 percent in the 2010 South Carolina Democratic primary for the U.S. Senate.

 

UNQUALIFIED PATSY

Alvin Greene was facing obscenity charges for showing pornography to a woman in a college computer lab. He had recently been kicked out of the military. He was unemployed.

Despite his lack of qualifications and income he spent $10,000 filing to run for senator. When Greene asked for a public defender in the obscenity case, many questioned how he had acquired the cash. There was speculation that he was a Republican plant.

Greene was unaffiliated with local Democrats. His campaign was nonexistent—no website, no yard sign, no public appearances, no fundraising, no advertisements.

 

CAREER PUBLIC SERVANT

Yet the voting machines showed Greene defeating former judge and four-term state legislator Vic Rawl by 30,000 votes.

Rawl was on the Charleston County Council. He was a respected community leader. He ran an active campaign with hundreds of volunteers. How could he have lost?

 

STATISTICAL EVIDENCE OF RIGGING

Hand-counted paper absentee ballots showed opposite results compared to electronic voting. Rawl won many of those votes—often by a large margin, a complete flip of what Greene had won on the voting machines.

According to Rawl's campaign manager Walter Ludwig, half of South Carolina's counties had a disparity between absentee and election day votes greater than 10 points. Spartanburg County was rife with anomalies: precincts where Greene received more votes than were actually cast, and precincts where votes appeared to be missing. Rarely did the vote totals match.

Ludwig also reported that a similar discrepancy between absentee and electronic votes "didn't happen in any other races on the ballot."

 

NO ACCOUNTABILITY

South Carolina is particularly vulnerable to fraudulent results because the entire state uses touchscreen voting machines made by Election Systems & Software. The iVotronic leaves no paper trail, making it impossible to verify elections for accuracy.

A security analysis by the University of Pennsylvania found “numerous exploitable vulnerabilities in nearly every component of the ES&S system.” These vulnerabilities open the voting machines to attacks that could “alter or forge precinct results, install corrupt firmware, and erase audit records.”

 

STRATEGIC RIGGING

Manipulating a low-attention primary to produce a weak opponent is a subtle way to rig a general election. Was Alvin Greene a legitimate candidate or an unqualified patsy set up for an untraceable electronic rig?

Greene ran in a subsequent election for the state legislature and won a mere 37 votes.

 

WHO BENEFITED

Jim DeMint and his right-wing backers were the ultimate beneficiaries of Alvin Greene’s implausible victory in the Democratic Senate primary.

DeMint sailed to victory with a massive margin over Greene, allowing his radical views to influence the U.S. Senate—no right to abortion in cases of rape, no gay civil rights, erosion of public health care, and weakening of Social Security.

DeMint later left the Senate to head an ultraconservative group that pushes oppressive voter ID regulations.



THE players

 

Alvin Greene

Nothing about Alvin Greene qualified him for the support of tens of thousands of voters. Greene had been recently kicked out of the military. He was unemployed. He was facing obscenity charges for showing pornography to a college girl in a computer lab (for which he accepted a pretrial offer of counseling and community service).

Greene's campaign was nonexistent. He was unaffiliated with local Democrats and totally unknown to the voters—he had no website, no yard sign, no campaign events, no advertisements. He did not raise campaign funds. He did not file appropriate documents with the Federal Election Commission. Greene was incoherent and evasive during media appearances.

People questioned how he had been able to afford the $10,00 campaign filing fee when he asked for a public defender to fight the obscenity charges. There was speculation that he had been given the money and was in fact a Republican plant.

 

Vic Rawl

Vic Rawl was the complete opposite of Alvin Greene. He ran an active and traditional political campaign, with 700 volunteers, social media, and events across the state. He was a member of the Charleston County Council. He was a South Carolina National Guard officer. He was a former judge and four-term state legislator. Rawl was highly qualified for the U.S. Senate.


I’m not a politican, I’m a public servant.
— Vic Rawl